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Getting the most out of your share

Posted 6/14/2013 7:49am by John Eisenstein.

Hello again!  

Now that a few weeks of (more or less) successful deliveries have gone by, I thought I'd go over a few ways that you can ensure that you are getting what you need out of your weekly box.  Every week, two days before the delivery day, I send out an email with the tentative share for the week.  It is a good idea to read this email.  Often I give you a choice of two or more items-- last week, for example, was spinach or kale-- and if you have a preference, you can email me what it is.  Also, sometimes we offer extras free of charge to the family and couples shares.  This does not replace anything in the share, we offer it when we have extras of things I feel aren't popular enough to give out every week, or that you may be getting tired of, or I am worried that it might not all get used.  Such items are designated  "by request" in the weekly email.  Finally, there is the substitution option.  If there is something on the list that you really don't want, you can request that we substitute it for something you do.  To see what we have available, check the a la carte list (on our website under the header "purchase") and pick a couple.  Please give us more than one option to substitute for your unwanted item, as some things may be in short supply.  However, I would encourage you to give everything a try at least once-- you never know what will become your new favorite until you do.

In your boxes this week: 

Strawberries

Lettuce

Spinach or Kale

Spring Onions

Radishes

Kohlrabi

Strawberries have not been the best crop this year, although this week's seemed a bit better than last's.  We had a good year with them last year and so I thought I knew a bit about strawberry culture.  Pride comes before the fall,  I guess.  Hopefully they have one more week in them.

New this week is Kohlrabi.  Kohlrabi is unusual among vegetables in that it is the swollen stem that is eaten.  (The leaves are edible but are rather tough and strong, so plan accordingly.)  The flavor is about halfway between broccoli and cabbage, with a hint of turnip and a little bit of oakiness in the nose, with a lingering finish reminiscent of black plums and linden flowers.  The only real drawback to kohlrabi, and probably the reason why they have yet to conquer the culinary world, is that their peels are quite thick and difficult to remove.  Carrot peelers are useless, you must use a sharp knife, being careful not to cut off your knuckles or tip of your pinky.  Once this has been accomplished, the real fun begins.  Slice the kohlrabi thinly and try a piece raw.  This is how many people enjoy it, sometimes with lime, olive oil, and salt.  If you wish to cook it, treat it as broccoli.

For descriptions, pictures, storage and cooking tips, and miscellaneous vegetable trivia, you can visit the "our variety" page in our website under the header "us and our products".  One of our summer interns, Kelley, is busy updating this page and adding the relevant information.  It is still a work in progress, but is getting better every week!

Crop update:  It has been extremely cool and wet for June.  Crops are all one to four weeks behind where they were last year.  I was hoping for peas and zucchini next week, but it looks unlikely, so next week's box will be quite similar to the last two.  It is, however, the best spinach crop we have ever had.  Every year is different.

  Finally, my dad has become quite enamored of facebook and is constantly updating our facebook page with pictures, farm happenings, and who knows what.  I've never seen the facebook page, or any facebook page for that matter.  Dana tried to show me how to use it once, but I just bleated, like a sheep, curled up in the fetal position and shut down entirely.

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